Night Sky Viewing: 2019

Must-see events are marked with three asterisks: ***

Supermoon Schedule

A supermoon occurs when the moon is at its closest approach to Earth, thereby making it look bigger during a full moon. There are three scheduled for 2018.

January 21
February 19
March 21

Full Moon Schedule

January 2
April 19
May 18
June 17
July 16
August 15
September 14
October 13
November 12
December 12

New Moon Schedule

This marks the best time to view faint objects in or out of the solar system. The light of the moon often obscures these sights.

January 6
February 4
March 6
April 5
May 4
June 3
July 2
August 1
August 30
September 28
October 28
November 26
December 26

Eclipse Schedule

January 6. Today there will be a partial solar eclipse best viewed from eastern Asia and northeastern Russia.

January 21. Today there will be a total lunar eclipse best viewed from North and South America, western Europe, and western Africa.

***July 2. Today there will be a TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE (the most spectacular event for celestial viewing on this list, bar none). This will be best viewed from central Chile and central Argentina.

July 16. Today there will be a partial lunar eclipse best viewed from Africa, central Asia, and Europe.

December 26. Today there will be an annular solar eclipse. Because the moon will be too distant to blot out the sun in total, there will be a ring of light surrounding a darkened moon. This will be best viewed from Saudi Arabia, northern Sri Lanka, southern India, and Indonesia.

Planet Viewing Schedule

These are the best times to view the planets depending on either proximity or angle of approach.

January 6, Venus. (Western Elongation).

***January 22, Venus and Jupiter. (Conjunction). This occurs when the planets are closely aligned as seen from Earth.

February 27, Mercury. (Eastern Elongation).

April 11, Mercury. (Western Elongation).

June 10, Jupiter. (Opposition).

June 23, Mercury. (Eastern Elongation).

July 9, Saturn. (Opposition).

August 9, Mercury. (Western Elongation).

September 9, Neptune. (Opposition).

October 20, Mercury. (Eastern Elongation).

October 27, Uranus. (Opposition).

***November 11, Mercury. (Transit). During this event, you will see the planet Mercury move directly across the sun. This event will not repeat itself until 2039, which is why we marked this as necessary viewing. Be sure to watch through a solar filter!

***November 24, Venus and Jupiter. (Conjunction). This occurs when the planets are closely aligned as seen from Earth.

November 28, Mercury. (Western Elongation).

Meteor Shower Schedule

January 3, Quadrantids. There will be up to 40 an hour at peak viewing time.

April 22, Lyrids. There will be up to 20 an hour at peak viewing time, but the light from the moon will likely block out much of the show.

May 6, Eta Aquarids. There will be up to 60 an hour at peak viewing time.

July 28, Delta Aquarids. There will be up to 20 an hour at peak viewing time.

August 12, Perseids. There will be up to 60 an hour at peak viewing time, but the light of the moon will likely block out much of the show.

October 8, Draconids. There will be up to 10 an hour at peak viewing time.

October 21, Orionids. There will be up to 20 an hour at peak viewing time, but the light of the moon will likely block out some of the show.

November 5, Taurids. There will be up to 10 an hour at peak viewing time.

November 17, Leonids. There will be up to 15 an hour at peak viewing time, but the light of the moon will likely block out much of the show.

***December 13, Geminids. There will be up to 120 an hour at peak viewing time, which is double the number of any other meteor shower on the list for this year. Although there is a full moon that will inevitably block out much of the show, these bright meteors can still deliver.

December 21, Ursids. There will be up to 10 meteors an hour at peak viewing time.